Archive for November, 2005

World AIDS Day

November 30, 2005





Today is World AIDS Day.

Take a moment and learn something new about AIDS. You can make a difference in the fight to prevent the disease. Last year almost 3 million people became infected with AIDS. Approximately 42,000 of those were in the United States. Just one is too many.

Get informed! Be safe! Educate others!

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Gays and Catholics

November 30, 2005

Another news article that stuns me:

On Tuesday, the Vatican announced that it intends to bar from the seminary men who “support the so-called gay culture” or have “deeply rooted gay tendencies.” Supporting gay culture?

A book published earlier this year, Educating Leaders for Ministry, unearths a study that estimates only 10% of seminarians are highly qualified for the educational component of their work and nearly 40% are hindered by poor education, learning disabilities or lack of familiarity with American culture. They do not even have the education portion under control, why is the focus now on fags?

How exactly does the Vatican expect to know who supports gay culture or if a man has gay tendencies? Is there going to be a Queer Eye for The Vatican Virgin? Five guys come by a potential seminary student’s home and search his home for gay tchokes, while one of them hits on him and another watches a boy-on- boy porn video with him to examine if he gets a woody?

I yet again support Sinead’s opinion on shenanigans in the Catholic Church.

Highly Educated Cities

November 30, 2005

USA Today reported the top US cities in 2004 for people ages 25 and older who have an advanced college degree in today’s paper:

Washington 26%
Seattle 20.9%
San Fran 19.5%
Atlanta 17.1%
Pittsburgh 16.5%
Raleigh, NC 16.3%

There is some fuzzy math going on here. Where are Boston, Cambridge, New York (Manhattan) or Westchester County only), San Diego and Chicago? With prices of homes in these cities, there is no way anyone can afford living there without an MD, Ph.D., MBA or all three combined. You know how I know USA Today is bullshit on this one: fucking PITTSburgh. Other than ‘The O’, what is there in P-town that would attract anyone with an advanced degree and a clue? What is there a bunch of MAs from Bob Jones University residing there? Do not tell me it’s all about Carneige Mellon and Teresa Heinz.

I think these cities paid off USA Today…

I Love A Good Email…

November 30, 2005

How can you help change Wal-Mart this Holiday season?
Get one more person to join the WakeUpWalMart.com campaign.
Yes, it’s that simple. We are building the largest grassroots campaign to change a corporation in history. In less than a year we have more than 138,000 supporters in all 50 states. But we have to reach our goal of 150,000 supporters by December 31st.
You can do it. Already, you have introduced Fair Share Health Care legislation (requiring large, profitable companies to pay their fair share for workers’ health care), raised money for uninsured workers, stood up to corporate special interest lobbyists, fought for social justice and put Wal-Mart on the defensive.
Now we need you to recruit your friends, family, co-workers, and neighbors to get us to 150,000 supporters by the end of the year.
Visit our special invitation page to invite your friends:
http://www.wakeupwalmart.com/friends

Why not?! We’re also working on the rollback…

It Couldn’t Be, Could It?

November 29, 2005

Is that The Uncanny Canadian? I’m thinking it’s our Canadian or the Jewish sell-out Jonah G., but I don’t think he has the brass to wear blue.

You just cannot resist a book with a foreword by the Village People. That’s quality people. I expect to see this under my menorah this year.

Musical Chairs

November 29, 2005

I read USA Today over dinner tonight. I admit it, I am a USA Today junkie. I get it free in my hotel room when I travel and it’s the quickest read in America. However, I am not here to discuss USA Today.

I don’t want any flack on what I am about to ask. I admit a cultural deficit about certain things and musical accomplishments is just one of said deficits. News media today announced that Black Sabbath, The Sex Pistols and Miles Davis are among this year’s inductees to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Having had a client in Cleveland for more than a year, I have been to ‘The Rock’ a few times. Yet, I am not sure that I ever learned about the wonders of Black Sabbath. I clearly understand Miles and it’s the fucking Sex Pistols people, but what has Sabbath offered to the world of music that earned them this rich nomination? I am not being a wise acre here, I really do not know.

The comment lines are open, let the Musical Jeopardy rock and roll …

Beef Cuts: Part 2 of 4 in the Beef Series

November 29, 2005

There are more than sixty cuts of beef and some go by more than one name. We recognize this is enough to cause an identify crisis at the meat counter. Don’t panic, we got you covered:

Information from MyButcher.com

Prime Ribeye Steak
Hand cut and trimmed from the heart of the prime rib. Traditionally a favority among steak lovers, this tender and juicy steak is perfect for grilling or broiling.
Prime New York Strip Steak
The New York Strip strikes a perfect balance between a higher fat steak such as a Ribeye, and a very lean steak like a Sirloin or Filet. It has an excellent amount of marbling, and is ideal for grilling.
Prime Porterhouse Steak
The Porterhouse is, just like a T-Bone, two steaks in one. One side is a New York Strip, and the other side is a Filet. The primary difference between a Porterhouse and T-Bone is that the Porterhouse will always have a large sized Filet portion.
Prime T-Bone Steak
A T-Bone is two steaks in one! One side is a full New York Strip, and the other side is Filet. The Filet size on a T-Bone is variable, ranging from a medium-sized piece shown above down to rather small. If you would like a consistently large Filet portion, check out our Porterhouse Steaks.
Prime Bone-In Ribeye Steak
What do you get when you leave the bone attached to a ribeye steak? Even more amazing flavor! Grill one and see for yourself.
Best Cuts Deluxe Box
Now you, your loved ones or business associates no longer have to leave the comfort of your own home to enjoy outstanding, upscale restaurant quality steaks: This sampler will definitely make an important event even more memorable.
Choice Porterhouse Steak
The Porterhouse is, just like a T-Bone, two steaks in one. One side is a New York Strip, and the other side is a Filet. The primary difference between a Porterhouse and T-Bone is that the Porterhouse will always have a large sized Filet portion.
Choice New York Strip Steak
The New York Strip strikes a perfect balance between a higher fat steak such as a Ribeye, and a very lean steak like a Sirloin or Filet. It has an excellent amount of marbling, and is ideal for grilling.
Choice Ribeye Steak
Hand cut and trimmed from the heart of the prime rib. Traditionally a favorite among steak lovers, this tender and juicy steak is perfect for grilling or broiling.
Choice T-Bone Steak
A T-Bone is two steaks in one! One side is a full New York Strip, and the other side is Filet. The Filet size on a T-Bone is variable, ranging from a medium-sized piece shown above down to rather small. If you would like a consistently large Filet portion, check out our Porterhouse Steaks.
Choice Filet Mignon
Our famous Filet Mignon is handcarved from the prized tenderloin and this delicate, lightly marbled steak is famous for its taste and tenderness. Each is wrapped in bacon to help ensure it retains enough moisture during cooking.
Choice Triple Trimmed Filet Mignon
These triple trimmed filets are perfect for anyone who likes a very low-fat steak. All exterior fat is carefully trimmed away, and no bacon wrapping is applied.
Choice Tenderloin / Chateaubriand Roast
Considered by many to be the finest roast in existence – the beef tenderloin / chateau briand roast is essentially one big filet mignon, that can serve between 2 to 8 people depending on the size you order.
Choice Tenderloin Tail
Delicious and juicy 4 oz Top Choice Tenderloin Tails. Made from the same wonderful beef tenderloin that we make our famous filet mignon from. Eat them as a steak, or slice them for use in many great recipes.
Choice Blue Cheese Stuffed Filet
This is one of our famous Filets, stuffed with loads of crumbled bleu cheese. Works great for grilling or broiling- just cup it in a bit of aluminum foil to prevent the cheese from escaping.

Well I’m not going to do it. I’m the Digital Ruler!

November 29, 2005

Phun Phacts about Res Publica’s Super-Awesome Adventures in Working for A Non-Profit Organization:

1. After almost two years of a total budget freeze (no COLA increase, no merit raises), we have been informed that we’ll all be getting a 3% cost of living increase starting in January. Conservatively estimating a 2% rate of retail inflation, and factoring in the share of our insurance premiums that we are now required to pay, that means that my real (inflation-adjusted) income has only declined by 80 dollars since 2004! Hopefully, if I work hard enough, I can lose enough purchasing power to finally move into that cardboard box I’ve been looking at!

2. In lieu of Christmas bonuses, this year we got $70 gift cards from (wait for it….) Walmart!! Since it’s already paid for, I’ll use mine to get gas. That way I don’t have to go inside Walmart.

3. With the resignation notice I received today, I can now accurately state that all my favorite coworkers have quit in the past two months.

4. My assistant has already requested the 21st and 22nd off. I was going to take that whole week off, but my boss will get pissed at me if we’re both gone, and he asked first, so unless I want to be a total selfish cock-knob, I’ll be working that week.

Here’s a summary of what my time in the non-profit sector has taught me: employment is always, ever, and only a business relationship, and when you let an organization bamboozle you into thinking otherwise with wifty talk about the nobility of the cause, you get screwed. In a business relationship, what is freely given is not valued at all. The more you give, the more a non-profit will take, until you’ve got nothing left at all.

A Tribute to Babka

November 28, 2005

Since our leader Res is back and in the holiday spirit, I just couldn’t resist this post! He asked me what babka was. Would you believe my little non Jewish and yenta friends — there is a website called babka.com that explains it all!

A sampling:

The Babka Coffee Cake originated in Eastern Europe and was brought to the United States by the early immigrants who settled in Brooklyn, New York. According to the Webster’s Encyclopedic Unabridged Dictionary of the English Language: “Bab•ka (noun) – a sweet, spongy yeast cake with raisins, traditionally made in the form of a high cylinder, either solid or with a hole, often glazed with raspberry-flavored coating, and sometimes flavored with rum. Polish diminutive of baba – old woman.” Grandmothers traditionally baked Babkas for Easter Sunday, but nowadays, every holiday is a good reason for baking. Babka is made of rich yeast dough enhanced with raisins, and flavored with a variety of cheese and fruit fillings. Still today, original Babka recipes are kept secret within families and passed on from one generation to the next.

One quick comment about the blurb above, they aren’t ‘grandmothers’. Any older women who makes babka is one or both of these things: a bubie and a bubelah.

FYI: The best babka sampled by these lips belongs to Hi Rise Bakery in Cambridge, Massachusetts. (Not Zabars or Zaro’s in New York).

And before Uncanny gets all Uncanny on us, the real Jewish McCoy this time of year is the donut like treat known as sufganiah.

Damned If You Do and Damned If You Don’t!

November 28, 2005

MOTHERS WITH MANY CHILDREN MOST AT RISK OF SEXUAL AND PHYSICAL VIOLENCE IN TANZANIA

A recent analysis by the Gutmacher Institute of nearly 1,500 in-person interviews with women in the urban district of Moshi, Tanzania, highlights the need for policies and programs aimed at empowering women to take control of their sex lives and fertility. One in five women interviewed said she had been physically or sexually abused—physically threatened, hit, slapped, kicked or otherwise physically hurt or forced to have sex against her will— by her partner in the past year. One in four reported having been abused in her lifetime.
In East Africa, where large families are common, women often bear the blame if a couple cannot conceive. Women who cannot bear children have twice the odds of being beaten or sexually abused by their partners as do mothers.
Surprisingly, women with larger than average families (five or more children) may be at even greater risk, with two-and-a-half times the odds of being beaten or sexually abused. As family size decreases all over Africa in response to changing cultural norms, the stigma of having an unusually large family and the financial strain of raising many children may contribute to this phenomenon. In other words, women are blamed for having too many children, or too few, and in a culture where violence against women is broadly accepted this blame may lead to abuse. Policies and programs should discourage men from blaming women for infertility, conclude authors Laura Ann McCloskey of the University of Pennsylvania, Corrine Williams of Harvard University and Ulla Larson of the University of Maryland in “Gender Inequality and Intimate Partner Violence Among Women in Moshi, Tanzania.

My wish this holiday season is for an end to domestic abuse. I wish that men and women could live equally in a world that is tolerant of all people and their lifestyles.